amphitrichous

memiliki satu flagellum, atau satu berkas flagela, pada setiap ujung- nya; merujuk pada sel bakteri. Lihat flagellum.

amphitrichous (Wikipedia)
For the insect anatomical structure, see Antenna (biology). For the flagella of male Solifugae, see Solifugae.
Flagellum
Flagellum base diagram en.svg
Structure of bacterial flagellum.
Chlamydomonas (10000x).jpg
SEM image of flagellated Chlamydomonas sp. (10000×)
Identifiers
TH H1.00.01.1.01032
FMA 67472
Anatomical terminology

A flagellum (/fləˈɛləm/; plural: flagella) is a lash-like appendage that protrudes from the cell body of certain prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The word flagellum in Latin means whip. The primary role of the flagellum is locomotion, but it also often has function as a sensory organelle, being sensitive to chemicals and temperatures outside the cell. Flagella are organelles defined by function rather than structure. Large differences occur between different types of flagella; the prokaryotic and eukaryotic flagella differ greatly in protein composition, structure, and mechanism of propulsion. However, both can be used for swimming.

An example of a flagellated bacterium is the ulcer-causing Helicobacter pylori, which uses multiple flagella to propel itself through the mucus lining to reach the stomach epithelium. An example of a eukaryotic flagellate cell is the mammalian sperm cell, which uses its flagellum to propel itself through the female reproductive tract. Eukaryotic flagella are structurally identical to eukaryotic cilia, although distinctions are sometimes made according to function and/or length.Fimbriae and pili are also thin appendages, but have different functions and are usually smaller.